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Know Your Teeth - Infobites - The Facts on Sedation -- Search By Keyword, Letter or Phrase - 1-877-2X-A-YEAR (1-877-292-9327)
Dental care and oral health information you need
from the Academy of General Dentistry

Wednesday, November 25, 2015
Know Your Teeth Academy of General Dentistry Know Your Teeth


Quick Reference

Halitosis (Bad Breath)

Do You Have Traveler's Breath?


Bad breath while traveling happens when the salivary glands slow down the production of saliva, which allows bacteria to grow inside the mouth and bad breath to develop.

Learn what those dental words mean.

Check out how your teeth and mouth change in every stage of life.



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The Facts on Sedation

Sedation allows dentists to create a state of relaxation and thus manage the fear and pain patients may experience during dental procedures. There are several different types of sedation in dentistry.
  • Local anesthesia is administered by injecting medication into tissue or by applying a medication topically to an area to eliminate sensation.
  • Minimal sedation is used most frequently in dentistry and usually involves taking medications orally. All bodily functions remain normal and the person is able to breathe on his or her own. The patient may respond normally to verbal commands and may experience some degree of amnesia about what happened during their dental appointment. Nitrous oxide or "laughing gas" may be used to achieve minimal sedation and in combination with a recommended dosage of oral medication.
  • Moderate sedation is achieved by using medications that can be taken orally or intravenously (IV). Patients who undergo moderate sedation are awake and respond to touch and/or verbal commands. All bodily functions remain normal, and the patient does not need assistance breathing.
  • Deep sedation can be achieved by injecting medication, giving oral medications, and in combination with gases. Patients who are deeply sedated are not easily awakened but may respond to some stimulation. Patients may need some breathing assistance at deeper levels.  

Reviewed: January 2012