4d Oyunlar Bomberman atari oyunlarý bakugan oyunlarý geta poker friv
Dental care and oral health information you need
from the Academy of General Dentistry


Tuesday, January 16, 2018
Know Your Teeth Academy of General Dentistry Know Your Teeth

Newsroom

All things dental. Personalize countdowns to dental visits, remember when to toss toothbrushes, read inside tooth tips, and more.

RSS

Feeds

Get dental news feeds delivered directly to your desktop! more...

Pacifiers Have Negative and Positive Effects


Thumbnail

There is an association between pacifier use and acute middle ear infections (otitis media).



Press Releases

Menstruation-induced Vomiting Contributes to Tooth Erosion

CHICAGO (February 18, 2009) - Monthly menstrual cycles produce many uncomfortable, and sometimes painful, symptoms, which can include cramps, headaches and bloating. With more intense, painful menstruation, a condition otherwise known as dysmenorrhea, regular vomiting also is a symptom. This monthly recurrence can cause severe tooth erosion, according to a study in the November/December 2008 issue of General Dentistry, the Academy of General Dentistry's (AGD) clinical, peer-reviewed journal.

 

This condition often masquerades as an eating disorder, since both dysmenorrhea and bulimia nervosa cause noticeable erosion on the back of the front teeth of the top jaw as a result of the exposure to stomach acid. However, it is imperative that patients understand the main distinguishing factor between the two conditions.

 

"Whereas bulimia nervosa is a voluntary act the woman induces vomiting herself dysmenorrhea is involuntary," says Mohamed Bassiuony, DMD, MSc, PhD, author of the study. "Contractions in the uterus or the abdominal wall force the patient to vomit without any cause."

 

Due to its uncontrollable force, dysmenorrhea also creates a different erosion pattern on the teeth. "A dentist can tell when a patient suffers from bulimia or dysmenorrhea, due to the distinct erosion patterns," says Dr. Bassiouny. "When vomiting is voluntary, the individual controls the direction and force," he says. "The tongue creates a tunnel which protects, in most instances the back teeth. When a patient has dysmenorrhea, the erosion affects almost all surfaces of the dentition to varying extents."

 

Dr. Bassiouny also notes that many women are affected by dysmenorrhea without knowing that the condition exists. "Roughly 52 percent of the population suffers from the condition," he says, "and women who are affected by dysmenorrhea usually do not detect the damage to their teeth until later in life." In his research, women become aware of dysmenorrhea's effects on teeth in their 50s or 60s, whereas women who suffer from bulimia do so most commonly in their 20s or 30s due to the fast rate of destruction by the frequent voluntary vomiting. The symptoms of dysmenorrhea, he says, can occur every three to four weeks and even outside of the traditional cycle, and last between 10-12 days.

 

When severe erosion occurs, "the tooth enamel is worn down, exposing the nerve endings of the teeth, which results in tooth sensitivity," says Connie White, DDS, FAGD, spokesperson for the AGD. Although erosion is not reversible, Dr. White says, dentists can help reduce the effects of the acid on the teeth by advising them on proper care. Patients should "rinse the mouth thoroughly during episodes of vomiting and avoid immediate brushing of the area. Brushing right after vomiting actually worsens the effects of the acid because it rubs the acid into the teeth."

 

According to Dr. Bassiouny, to treat the condition it is imperative that women inform all health professionals of the symptoms. "The condition and associated dental fall out are not purely medical or purely dental," he says. "Women who suffer from dysmenorrhea need to be treated by a gynecologist for internal causes and by the dentist to restore and prevent further damage to the dentition. This coordinated effort of management is the best course of action."

 

Dental effects of dysmenorrhea:

  • Teeth may show loss of enamel

  • Exposed dentin of affected teeth may appear brownish

  • Sensitivity due to dental erosion

  • Teeth appear shorter

  • Disfigurement of facial esthetics


The Academy of General Dentistry (AGD) is a professional association of more than 35,000 general dentists dedicated to staying up-to-date in the profession through continuing education. Founded in 1952, the AGD has grown to become the world's second largest dental association, which is the only association that exclusively represents the needs and interests of general dentists. A general dentist is the primary care provider for patients of all ages and is responsible for the diagnosis, treatment, management and overall coordination of services related to patients' oral health needs. Learn more about AGD member dentists or find more information on dental health topics at www.KnowYourTeeth.com.

Note: Information that appears in General Dentistry, the AGD's peer-reviewed journal, AGD Impact, the AGD's newsmagazine and related press releases do not necessarily reflect the endorsement of the AGD.

 
 

*For a complete list of oral health and industry press releases, visit the AGD News Releases.

Need help?
Contact the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD)'s public relations team:

Lauren Henderson
312.440.4974
media@agd.org

Audio/Video
Public Service Announcement (PSA) —Dry mouth with background musicMP3
PSA—Dry mouth without background musicMP3
PSA—Your Mouth: A Window To Your Body WMV (Requires Windows Media Player)

games