4d Oyunlar Bomberman atari oyunlarý bakugan oyunlarý geta poker friv
Dental care and oral health information you need
from the Academy of General Dentistry


Saturday, January 20, 2018
Know Your Teeth Academy of General Dentistry Know Your Teeth

Newsroom

All things dental. Personalize countdowns to dental visits, remember when to toss toothbrushes, read inside tooth tips, and more.

RSS

Feeds

Get dental news feeds delivered directly to your desktop! more...

Pacifiers Have Negative and Positive Effects


Thumbnail

There is an association between pacifier use and acute middle ear infections (otitis media).



Press Releases

Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Lesion Identified at the Dentist

CHICAGO (February 18, 2009) - Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a group of viruses that includes more than 100 different strains or types and is the most common sexually transmitted virus. The American Social Health Association (ASHA) reports that 75 percent or more of sexually active Americans will contract HPV sometime in their lives. HPV is most commonly attributed to causing cervical cancer and genital warts, but did you know HPV also causes oral cancer?

 

According to a study in the September/October 2008 issue of General Dentistry, the clinical, peer-reviewed journal of the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD), oral HPV can be detected using a new device that patients are screened with during routine oral examinations. This device is the VELscope. It emits a bright, indigo blue light and filters to help the dentist identify potential damage to the oral cavity.

 

John C. Comisi, DDS, FAGD, author of the study, showed that the blue light emitted and filters used in the VELscope can aid in detecting cancerous oral tissue. The study explains that when emitting a specific wavelength of light into the mouth, oral fluorescence occurs, which in turn causes the tissue to emit its own light (this is called natural fluorescence). The VELscope produces a blue light that excites the oral tissue cells. Healthy cells will fluoresce back and appear green in color, while damaged and unhealthy cells will not fluoresce and thus appear as black or dark maroon areas against the green surrounding tissue. 

 

"Surgery can remove cancerous lesions, but typically if they are found at a late stage, the surgery can be extensive," says Dr. Comisi. "Only early detection can help to minimize the extent of surgery needed to eradicate the disease. The earlier a lesion is detected, the higher the rate of survival," he adds.

 

The Oral Cancer Foundation says that more than 34,000 Americans will be diagnosed with oral or pharyngeal cancer this year. Of those 34,000 newly diagnosed individuals, only half will be alive in 5 years. It will cause over 8,000 deaths—killing roughly 1 person per hour, 24 hours per day. The Oral Cancer Foundation warns that oral cancer is typically hard to diagnose because in early stages, it may not be noticed by the patient. The next time you visit your dentist, ask about oral cancer screening—most people receive one during their regular dental checkup but do not realize it. AGD spokesperson, Eugene Antenucci, DMD, FAGD, says, "Dentists have a unique ability to diagnose disease at an early stage. All dentists are trained to do comprehensive oral screening examinations—each individual practitioner decides on how to implement their training in their practices."

 

Numerous studies have shown a connection to oral and overall health. That is why it is important to disclose all health related problems to a dentist—including STDs. "Web site educational information also proves helpful in informing and educating patients regarding diseases such as HPV, its mode of transmission, means of prevention, and the need for regular examinations utilizing technologies such as VELscope for early detection," says Dr. Antenucci.

 

Prevention and detection

  • Maintain regular dental check-ups

  • Ask your dentist to perform an oral cancer screening

  • Disclose your medical history to your dentist including STDs

  • Avoid tobacco and alcohol use

  • If you notice abnormal growths, discoloration, tenderness, or bleeding contact your dentist right away.


The Academy of General Dentistry (AGD) is a professional association of more than 35,000 general dentists dedicated to staying up-to-date in the profession through continuing education. Founded in 1952, the AGD has grown to become the world's second largest dental association, which is the only association that exclusively represents the needs and interests of general dentists. A general dentist is the primary care provider for patients of all ages and is responsible for the diagnosis, treatment, management and overall coordination of services related to patients' oral health needs. Learn more about AGD member dentists or find more information on dental health topics at www.KnowYourTeeth.com.

Note: Information that appears in General Dentistry, the AGD's peer-reviewed journal, AGD Impact, the AGD's newsmagazine and related press releases do not necessarily reflect the endorsement of the AGD.

 
 

*For a complete list of oral health and industry press releases, visit the AGD News Releases.

Need help?
Contact the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD)'s public relations team:

Lauren Henderson
312.440.4974
media@agd.org

Audio/Video
Public Service Announcement (PSA) —Dry mouth with background musicMP3
PSA—Dry mouth without background musicMP3
PSA—Your Mouth: A Window To Your Body WMV (Requires Windows Media Player)

games