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Know Your Teeth - Infobites - Spit Tobacco -- Search By Keyword, Letter or Phrase - 1-877-2X-A-YEAR (1-877-292-9327)
Dental care and oral health information you need
from the Academy of General Dentistry


Tuesday, April 24, 2018
Know Your Teeth Academy of General Dentistry Know Your Teeth

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Children's Oral Health

Like Parent, Like Child: Good Oral Health Starts at Home


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Providing oral health education to families is essential to teaching children healthy habits and preventing early childhood tooth decay.



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Check out how your teeth and mouth change in every stage of life.

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Spit Tobacco

 
Chapter: Spit Tobacco and Your Health

It causes bad breath, discolors teeth and promotes tooth decay that leads to tooth loss. Spit tobacco users have a decreased sense of smell and taste, and they are at greater risk of developing cavities. The grit in snuff eats away at gums, exposing tooth roots, which are sensitive to hot and cold temperatures and can be painful. The sugar in spit tobacco further contributes to decay. Spit tobacco users also have a hard time getting their teeth clean.

 

The most common sign of possible cancer in smokeless tobacco users is leukoplakia, a white, scaly patch or lesion inside the mouth or lips, common among many spit tobacco users. Red sores are also a warning sign of cancer. Often, signs of precancerous lesions are undetectable. Dentists can diagnose and treat such cases before the condition develops into oral cancer. If a white or red sore appears and doesn't heal, see your dentist immediately for a test to see if it's precancerous. Spit tobacco users also should see their dentist every three months, to make sure a problem doesn't develop. Studies have found that 60 to 78 percent of daily users of spit tobacco have oral lesions.
 
Reviewed: January 2012