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Dental care and oral health information you need
from the Academy of General Dentistry


Thursday, January 18, 2018
Know Your Teeth Academy of General Dentistry Know Your Teeth

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Pacifiers Have Negative and Positive Effects


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There is an association between pacifier use and acute middle ear infections (otitis media).



Press Releases

Disclosure of Medication Can Save a Patient's Life

CHICAGO (November 25, 2008)- Do you regularly take aspirin or antiplatelet medications? Do you know whether or not these drugs should be stopped before dental procedures or surgeries? According to a study published in the May/June issue of General Dentistry, the clinical, peer-reviewed journal of the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD), stopping antiplatelet medications prior to a surgical procedure places a patient at greater risk of permanent disability or death.

 

The probability of a patient bleeding depends on the over-the-counter and/or prescribed drug or combinations of drugs.

 

"A thorough drug history should be reviewed prior to any procedures," notes Mary Aubertin, DMD, lead author of the study. Dr. Aubertin recommends that the dentist and patient start with a simple discussion. "The dentist and the patient should discuss the risks and benefi ts of treatment with or without the drugs versus no treatment and include the patient's physician's opinion in the decision making process. This will allow everyone involved to understand and prevent medical risks."

 

Fortunately, due to the prevalence of this type of medication, dentists are prepared to treat these situations. According to AGD spokesperson Carolyn Taggart-Burns, DDS, "excessive bleeding is a major concern with many dental procedures due to the extensive prescribing of blood thinners in America. Heart disease is so prevalent that many patients are on these drugs, which can complicate even the simplest procedure." Dr. Taggart-Burns reminds patients that it is very important "to communicate medical history with your dentist so that they can provide the best care possible."

 

What happens after a procedure is also important to the dentist. Patients who experience excessive bleeding or bruising after the surgery, in spite of applying pressure to the site with wet gauze or a wet tea bag for 20-30 minutes, should contact the dentist for evaluation and treatment.

 

"Informing the dentist of medical issues is the first step. Working with the patient's physician and the patient to develop a plan is also important. Last, staying healthy is the best way to have a successful procedure," says Dr. Taggart-Burns.

 

What you should do before a dental procedure:

  • Schedule a consultation with the dentist

  • Disclose all prescribed and over-the-counter medicines to your dentist

  • Disclose your medical history and concerns

  • Discuss the risks and benefits of treatment with or with out the drugs

  • Ask the dentist if they have an office emergency plan


The Academy of General Dentistry (AGD) is a professional association of more than 35,000 general dentists dedicated to staying up-to-date in the profession through continuing education. Founded in 1952, the AGD has grown to become the world's second largest dental association, which is the only association that exclusively represents the needs and interests of general dentists. A general dentist is the primary care provider for patients of all ages and is responsible for the diagnosis, treatment, management and overall coordination of services related to patients' oral health needs. Learn more about AGD member dentists or find more information on dental health topics at www.KnowYourTeeth.com.

Note: Information that appears in General Dentistry, the AGD's peer-reviewed journal, AGD Impact, the AGD's newsmagazine and related press releases do not necessarily reflect the endorsement of the AGD.

 
 

*For a complete list of oral health and industry press releases, visit the AGD News Releases.

Need help?
Contact the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD)'s public relations team:

Lauren Henderson
312.440.4974
media@agd.org

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Public Service Announcement (PSA) —Dry mouth with background musicMP3
PSA—Dry mouth without background musicMP3
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